Off the Beaten Path – Cedar Hedge Gardens – Michigan

Hostas surround the Courtney's house at Cedar Hedge Gardens, Interlochen, Michigan

Cedar Hedge Gardens – walk a woodchip path through hundreds of Hosta plants

Do you like Hosta plants…hundreds, maybe thousands of them? Then you would love Cedar Hedge Gardens in Interlochen Michigan.

I don’t remember how I discovered their garden. I think, probably on the Internet. Someone mentioned a great “Hosta Lady” that lived up north…and this is the garden I found.

At the very back of a modest subdivision lies a special garden of a Hostaphile; collector of Hostas. The gardens are named after Cedar Hedge Lake, where their house and gardens dwell. Four acres of over 1,000 Hosta plants, 600 plus different varieties and sizes, perennials, garden statues, structures and water features carved out of wilderness and built by the Courtney’s, great for wandering the many paths. Every time I go back, I see something new they have built or added. 

They are open most of the year, even in winter for a stroll through their garden, a view of the lake or in spring and summer, to purchase Hostas from their nursery.

Donna knows the names of every single Hosta variety, details about their growth and where each one is planted, so you can see a mature specimen plant before you buy.

This is not a typical nursery. Donna will personally walk you around if she is home, show you some of her favorite plants, make suggestions…and Gary will help load your car. There isn’t any better service than that. If you collect certain themed Hosta plants such as those with food names, fragrant, Star Trek related, you name it she has it.

I love the way her nursery tables are arranged, above table height, so you don’t have to bend…unless you are reaching for that perfect plant at the back.

When I last visited, I got hooked on miniatures. She has a raised bed fairy themed garden with teeny mature Hosta plants no bigger than a 50 cent piece with leaves the size of a fingernail! She claims she leaves them out all winter, on the ground covered with leaves. If you are familiar with hardiness zones, they are a zone 5! This means winter temperatures can reach -20 degrees fahrenheit. Now that is cold!

Would you believe she cuts off the flowers when they bloom? She claims that there would be a terrible “Sea of purple”, if she didn’t cut them. Donna loves to see the foliage and also says the plants stay healthier if not allowed to put energy into blooming. I have started removing my flowers, if I get to them in time…

In fall, when leaves get ratty looking she weed wacks them down. I’ve never had the nerve…I let them die a slow death…gosh that sounds terrible…

Donna’s latest endeavor is making metal sculptures. Her husband, Gary complains that she has taken over his workshop. Her art is scattered through the garden and she has some for sale.

If you visit, make sure to say that Sandie sent you…!

“Hosta” la vista!

Sandie

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4 Responses to Off the Beaten Path – Cedar Hedge Gardens – Michigan

  1. Paula says:

    The hosta gardens are lovely — thanks for the story.

  2. Stacey Hyde says:

    Thats my Aunt Donna place, I am lucky to have many of her off spring plants. They are all beautiful

  3. Liz says:

    I was just there (again) today! She certainly has a bundle of hostas! She’s always a joy to talk to and there is so much to walk around and see! It’s a special little place, definitely off the beaten path but well worth a visit!

    • Liz,

      I haven’t been up there in a while…I’m going to make a vow I visit this summer. Love the giant hostas and love what they have done to their land and yes, they are the nicest people. In May 2006 I wrote an article for the Michigan Gardener about Cedar Hedge Gardens. If you are interested, contact the editor at http://www.michigangardener.com for a copy.
      Enjoy your hosta…!
      Sandie

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